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Different Types of Arthritis and How You Can Help Yourself

Arthritis is the inflammation of one or more joints in the body. There are different types of arthritis that will have slightly different symptoms, clinical presentations and causes. What are the different types? The two most common types or a

2017-07-12 15:06:23

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What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is the inflammation of one or more joints in the body. There are different types of arthritis that will have different symptoms, clinical presentations and causes. 


What are the most common types? 

The two most common types or arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, which are also two of the most common musculoskeletal conditions that affect people throughout North America. 


Osteoarthritis (OA) involves a degeneration of the cartilage that surrounds the ends of bones that meet to create a joint in the body. 


How does it happen? 
Acute injury, muscle weakness or imbalance, and poor preparation for activity are some of the main reasons why someone may initially start to develop osteoarthritis. These circumstances result in the weakening of the supporting structures (ligaments, muscles) of the joint which results in greater contact and more friction between the ends of the bones. This increased friction causes damage and degeneration to the cartilage and can eventually lead to direct bone on bone contact. 

What are the symptoms?
Pain during movement is the main symptom of osteoarthritis. This usually occurs in a single joint, with a small degree of inflammation and audible grating that may limit full range of motion. Often morning stiffness and pain generally lasts less than 30 minutes. 

Who is most affected?
OA affects around 14% of the population, with the incidence rising with age. It is estimated that 12.4 million adults over the age of 65 suffer with OA and it is more frequent among women. Risk factors associated with developing OA include age, joint trauma, prolonged stress and use from exercise and sports activities or obesity particularly affecting weight-bearing joints. 


Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune condition that affects joints om both sides of the body at the same time. 


How does it happen?
The initial triggers of RA are not well known, but it appears that hormones, genetics and environmental factors may all play a role. As with any autoimmune condition, the body's own immune system begins to react against its own tissue and in the case of RA, it attacks the tissues of the capsule that surrounds the joints. This results in large amount of inflammation which will cause pain and overtime direct damage to the cartilage and bone within the joint. 

What are the symptoms?
Classic RA symptoms include joint pain, redness, warmth and swelling. Fatigue and fever can also be symptoms during acute flare-ups.  Any joint can be involved, however it typically occurs in small joints further away from the body (eg. Wrists, finger joints). Morning stiffness and pain lasts longer than 30 minutes. 

Who is most affected?
It is estimated that 1.5 million adults are suffering from RA and in general the average age of sufferer is younger then that of OA, with the onset of the disease typically occurring between 20 and 30 years of age. The incidence of RA is also more common in women, as is seen with autoimmune conditions in general. 


How can you treat it?

  1. Maintaining or increasing activity levels is important to help any arthritis patient maintain mobility and function. While high impact sports are not advised, strengthening exercises, non-weight bearing exercises such as swimming and water aerobics are especially helpful to maintain daily function. 
  2. Weight loss is often suggested for patients who are overweight, to help alleviate some of the stress on weight bearing joints.
  3. Eating a healthy diet that limits inflammation throughout the body
  4. Supplementing your diet with a high quality joint support supplement like ArthGold.


What are the ArthGold products?

ArthGold- Max

1. MSM (Dimethyl sulfone) (1600mg)- MSM is a source organic sulfur donor for the body. Studies have shown that patients with OA have lower amounts of sulfur in their joints and that MSM alone can reduce swelling and pain scores while also improving function when compared to placebo(4). It was also effective in significantly decreasing the needs for anti-inflammatory drugs. 

2. Devil’s Claw (600mg)- a South African plant whose active component is known to  have anti-inflammatory properties similar to NSAID drugs. In an 8-week study involving 260 patients there were statistically significant improvements in patient assessed global pain, stiffness and function in those supplemented with devil’s claw. Quality of life also improved and use of pain medication was significantly decreased (5). 

3. Chondroitin sulfate- one of the basic components of cartilage. Aside from exhibiting anti-inflammatory actions, chondroitin has shown to slow the progression of joint-space narrowing by providing resistance to compression and helping to maintain the structural integrity and slowing the breakdown of cartilage (3). While it generally takes 2-8 weeks for these effects to be felt, the effects are sustained for longer when compared to most pain relief medications (4). 
 
4. Curcuma Longa (400mg)- an anti-inflammatory compound from the spice turmeric, curcumin has also shown to specifically protect cartilage cells from inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that curcumin may be as effective as ibuprofen on pain with walking and stair climbing (4). It is safe and well tolerated by most people, though patients on blood thinning medications should be cautious. 


ArthGold- Joint Pain Relief

1. White Willow (1500mg)- an extract of the bark of Salix alba tree which has been used historically for over 2000 years to treat pain and inflammation. The drug Aspirin was originally derived from the salicin from this tree. It appears however that other ingredients present in the bark, such as other salicylates, polyphenols and flavonoids may also play a role it is therapeutic actions, such as antioxidant effects and immune enhancing properties (6). Decreases in pain are generally evident after one week of use (6). 

2. Turmeric (240mg)- can act to protect cartilage cells from inflammatory factors. Studies have demonstrated that curcumin may be as effective as ibuprofen on pain with walking and stair climbing (4). It is safe and well tolerated by most people. 

3. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) (1000mg)- MSM acts as organic sulfur donor in the body. Studies have shown that patients with OA have lower amounts of sulfur in their joints. Studies have shown that MSM alone can reduce swelling and pain scores while also improving function when compared to placebo(4).

4. Hyaluronic Acid (15mg)- one of the basic components of cartilage and the fluid within that joint capsule which acts as a lubricant and shock absorber when then joint is under stress. Patients with osteoarthritis show reductions in the concentrations of endogenous hyaluronic acid. Oral supplementation has shown to be absorbed and taken up in joint tissue, resulting in improvements in physical function (4).  



Sources:

1. Kori A. Dewing, DNP, FNP, ARNP; Stephen M. Setter, PharmD, DVM, CDE,CGP, FASCP; Barbara A. Slusher, MSW, PA-C Osteoarthritis and 
Rheumatoid ¬Arthritis 2012: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, 
and Treatment. CLINICAL FEATURE The Clinical Advisor, October 31, 2012
2. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arthritis/home/ovc-20168903
3. Bishnoi M, Jain A, Hurkat P, Jain SK. Chondroitin sulphate: a focus on osteoarthritis. Glycoconj J. 2016 May 19. [Epub ahead of print]
4. Lopez HL. Nutritional interventions to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. Part II: focus on micronutrients and supportive nutraceuticals. PM R. 2012 May;4(5 Suppl):S155-68.
5.  Warnock M, McBean D, Suter A, Tan J, Whittaker P. Effectiveness and safety of Devil's Claw tablets in patients with general rheumatic disorders. Phytother Res. 2007 Dec;21(12):1228-33.
6. Shara M, Stohs SJ. Efficacy and Safety of White Willow Bark (Salix alba) Extracts. Phytother Res. 2015 Aug;29(8):1112-6. doi: 10.1002/ptr.5377. Epub 2015 May 22.




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1 Comments
Isaac G. Lee (lgp114@hotmail.com)
2017-08-08 19:07:33

i love it

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