en | US
en | US
×

Take Chitosan to Improve Cholesterol Levels!

Chitosan is a carbohydrate found in the exoskeletons (external skeletons) of arthropods, usually crustaceans (shrimp, crab, lobster) and the walls of some fungi. It is biocompatible and non-toxic which is why it has received attention as something that ca

2017-07-01 15:15:42

mtabolic syndromchitosancholesterolheart healthnutridom


57551107_ml.jpg



What is it?

Chitosan is a carbohydrate found in the exoskeletons (external skeletons) of arthropods, usually crustaceans (shrimp, crab, lobster) and the walls of some fungi. It is bio-compatible and non-toxic which is why it has received attention as something that can be used for human consumption. 

What is it most useful for?

Along with dietary and lifestyle changes, chitosan may be most useful for those individuals suffering from excess body fat, abnormal cholesterol levels and high blood sugar levels or metabolic syndrome which involves the presentation of these conditions together.


What does the research say?

Human studies involving the use of chitosan have demonstrated its ability to bind with fats in the intestine and prevent their absorption, as well as inhibit the release of pancreatic lipase, which is an enzyme that helps breakdown fat. These combined actions have resulted in several studies reporting improved overall cholesterol profiles of patients with high cholesterol levels. A 12-week double blind placebo controlled trial involving subjects with pre-diabetes, showed that those given chitosan supplementation had significant improvements in several markers of sugar control. 

Aside from improving cholesterol and blood sugar control, animal studies have also shown that chitosan supplementation decreased markers of inflammation and peripheral fat accumulation. One study also demonstrated that rats fed a high fat diet for several weeks which resulted in fat accumulation in the liver, a condition known as Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). The rats were then given a 4-week treatment of chitosan, which not only improved blood lipid levels but also improved liver enzyme activity and other abnormalities caused by NAFLD. While more human studies are needed, these findings indicate a possible treatment option for the 20-30% of the population in the western world that suffer from NAFLD.  

 

Caution! Those with allergies to shellfish should NOT take chitosan! You should always seek advice about taking chitosan from your qualified medical provider especially however if you currently take warfarin or other blood thinners or are taking medications for diabetes. Chitosan may prevent the absorption of fat soluble vitamins such as vitamins A,D,E and K thus is it suggested that it be taken away from other supplements. Side effects may include some digestive upset, constipation and gas.



Sources

Pallela R. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates. Adv Food Nutr Res. 2014;73:183-95.

Patti AM, Katsiki N, Nikolic D, Al-Rasadi K, Rizzo M. Nutraceuticals in lipid-lowering treatment: a narrative review on the role of chitosan. Angiology. 2015 May;66(5):416-21.

Kim HJ, Ahn HY, Kwak JH, Shin DY, Kwon YI, Oh CG, Lee JH. The effects of chitosan oligosaccharide (GO2KA1) supplementation on glucose control in subjects with prediabetes. Food Funct. 2014 Oct;5(10):2662-9

Ahmed, M. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015. World J Hepatol. 2015 Jun 18; 7(11): 1450–1459.


<Written by David Health Research Centre>

03/04/2017


Related Products


1 Comments
Isaac G. Lee (lgp114@hotmail.com)
2017-06-21 14:48:22

very good

Subject
Tag
Product
Warning: